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A daily view of all the goings-on at ASTRON and JIVE.

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    © ASTRON

    In December 2016 the fiber infrastructure in the ASTRON building was heavily upgraded, thanks to the people of Facility Services. To be prepared for the future, the main labs have been connected with a significant number of fibers to the basement, which houses the Internet Access Point and a cluster of computing machines. A few months ago, the Computing and DESP groups have been working together to build a network test setup to experiment with very high datarates of 100 Gigabit per second from the digital lab to the basement. The goal was to transmit a continuous high datarate flow from the Gemini POC board, designed for the SKA Low correlator, to a Server. Receiving high sustained datarates on servers is far from trivial and therefore an presented an interesting challenge.

    The Gemini board has a powerful Xilinx UltraScale+ FPGA and can perfectly be used as a 100G data packet generator.

    More information on Gemini can be found on the following daily images:

    http://www.astron.nl/dailyimage/index.html?main.php?date=20170501

    http://www.astron.nl/dailyimage/index.html?main.php?date=20170807

    The image shows Gijs and Leon working on the connection of the digital lab to the Gemini board. In the top left, the moment of excitement is captured, when the experiment started to become successful, together with John. Finally, a screenshot of a nano fraction of the received 100G data on the Server in the basement is shown in the bottom right corner on top of an enlargement of the Gemini board. The data was generated and sent by the FPGA on the Gemini board and transported on a link between Gemini and a Server of the DAS-5 compute cluster via a 100 meter single mode optical link.


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    © Photos: Henri Meulman, Nico Ebbendorf

    During the ILT Board meeting of 26th September 2017, the official signing of full membership of the Irish LOFAR consortium (I-LOFAR) in the International LOFAR Telescope(ILT) foundation took place.

    Witnessed by ILT director Dr. René Vermeulen and the ILT-board members, Professor Peter Gallagher on behalf of the I-LOFAR consortium, together with ILT Board Chair Prof. Philip Best, signed the membership certificate (see picture), confirming that Ireland is the lucky 7th European country to have membership in the International LOFAR telescope!

    LOFAR is a multi-national facility, with ASTRON as the coordinating operational entity for the International LOFAR Telescope. It is a Foundation under Dutch law, and has board members from LOFAR consortia in each of the countries where LOFAR stations are located. The telescope consists of 38 stations in the Netherlands, six in Germany, three in Poland, and one in France, Sweden and the UK. In July 2017, IE613, the thirteenth International LOFAR station, was completed on the grounds of Birr Castle in Ireland (see picture below) The data taken by individual LOFAR stations can be locally processed for scientific programmes, and are also transported by fiber links for combined processing in a central super computer hosted at the University of Groningen in the Netherlands: the ILT is now an aperture synthesis telescope network which spans over 2000 km; it is the largest and most powerful low frequency radio telescope in existence.

    The I-LOFAR consortium is consisting of following universities and institutes:

    Trinity College Dublin, Armagh Observatory, University College Dublin, National University of Ireland - Galway, Dublin Institute for Advanced Studies, Dublin City Univerisity, Athlone Institute of Technology and University College Cork.

    The Irish membership of the ILT not only has significantly enlarged the long-baseline capabilities of LOFAR, but also will contribute to new exiting science with this radio telescope!

    Pictured here are:

    Left picture: Dr René Vermeulen (Director of ILT), Prof. Peter Gallagher (Head of the I-LOFAR Consortium) and Prof. Philip Best (Chair of the ILT Board).
    Right picture:

    Prof. Dominik Schwarz (DE), Prof. Andrzej Krankowski (PL), Prof. Carole Jackson (ASTRON), Prof. Peter Gallagher (IE), Dr. René Vermeulen (ILT/ASTRON), Prof. Philip Best (UK), Prof. Huub Rottgering (NL), Dr. Marijke Haverkorn (NL).
    Picture below, right:

    The I-LOFAR station was officially opened on 27th of July by the Irish Minister of State for Training, Skills, Innovation, Research and Development, John Halligan T.D., in the presence of Lord Rosse (who generously made available the land at Birr Castle), I-LOFAR Chair Prof. Peter Gallagher and other representatives of the I-LOFAR consortium, ILT Director René Vermeulen and ASTRON Roll-out manager Nico Ebbendorf, many other well-wishers, and members of the press.
    Picture below left: LOFAR station at Birr, Co. Offaly Ireland.


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    © public

    The SKA Director-General, Phil Diamond, visited ASTRON on Tuesday 24th October. He tries, as best he can, to periodically visit all of the major SKA partner institutes to talk to staff engaged in SKA design work and science planning and, in the case of ASTRON, to meet with the leader of the Low-Frequency Aperture Array Consortium (Jan Geralt bij de Vaate) and other senior ASTRON staff, including Carole Jackson, the new General and Scientific Director.

    Phil gave an SKA status report to all staff; he mentioned the recent election of Catherine Cesarsky as the new Chair of the SKA Board; he provided an update on the engineering design efforts, and showed photographs of prototype dish hardware, the aperture array verification system in Western Australia, the Band 1 feeds being developed in Sweden, the Band 2 receivers being developed jointly in South Africa and Canada, the prototype Non-Imaging Processing board from the UK and Australia, and the SKA-Low correlator/beamformer board being developed jointly by ASTRON and CSIRO.

    He also showed an aerial shot of the new 1.6 MW solar power station at the Murchison Radioastronomy Observatory, which is soon to be fully operational. Another aerial photograph showed excellent progress on the construction of the SKA HQ in the shadow of the Lovell telescope at Jodrell Bank in the UK; the building extension will be complete in June 2018.

    Phil finished up by telling us about the good progress towards the signing of the Convention (or treaty) that will establish the SKA Observatory, the estimated construction and operations costs for the observatory and the cost control measures that have been implemented and ended with a few words about the overall schedule, which will hopefully see construction activities starting around the end of 2019.


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  • 10/31/17--17:00: Responsive Telescope
  • © Jasper Annyas & Auke Klazema

    We invite you to share in the latest success of the Radio Observatory with us and a piece of cake. A long standing wish of our LOFAR users has been fulfilled with the delivery of the Responsive Telescope functionality in the October software roll out. Our versatile telescope now reacts on external triggers, without the need of personnel in the control room and can do this faster than the manual procedure. Some checks are done (f.i. comparing the priority of the trigger to that of the current observation) and if they all comply, the current observation is aborted and the one specified in the trigger is loaded in the scheduler. There you go: LOFAR hunts for another unique event in the sky!

    Next to this important step in the LOFAR development, the RO got valuable experience delivering new software, while at the same time doing general support. This will be used in our future projects, as we want to improve and expand on our software deliveries, while at the same time keeping up our support.


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    © Mercedes Filho

    Extremely Metal-Poor Dwarf Galaxies (XMPs) are the best local analogs of the first generation of low-mass galaxies formed early on, possessing chemical abundances as close as possible to that of the primordial Universe. XMPs are defined as galaxies having ionized gas with an oxygen abundance lower than a tenth of the solar value. They are commonly blue compact dwarfs (BCDs) characterized by blue colors, low luminosity and mass, and compactness. In over 75% of the cases, XMPs exhibit asymmetric optical morphology, associated with a massive and extended HI component. In addition, XMPs are undergoing a burst of star formation, forming stars at a rate similar to high redshift sources. Notwithstanding, the majority of the XMPs appear to be isolated and/or are associated with low-density environments, so that merger/interaction processes are likely not responsible for the XMP properties.

    Instead, it has been suggested that most of the XMP characteristics can be explained through cosmological gas accretion.

    In this talk I will present the main results on the multi-wavelength study of XMPs: their characteristics and components, the relations with other galaxy populations and possible explanations for their properties.


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    © Ilse van Bemmel

    In the short space of six months the Astronomy kwartet set has moved from an idea on a whiteboard to a fully functioning and attractive game.

    And, of course none of this would have been possible without a whole team of people involved. From writing to designing, from funding to editing there are a lot of people who have offered their expertise to ensure this project was a success.

    On 25th October team leader, Paula Fusiara, brought everyone together to celebrate the completion of 'Astronomie? Zo werkt het!'. She made a masterpiece of a cake, complete with asteroids, multiple layers and A LOT of blue food colouring!

    While this celebration may signal the completion of 'Astronomie? Zo werkt het!', it also marks the beginning of 'Astronomy? That's how it works!'. Demand has been high for an English version of the game and work has already begun on translating the cards. Watch this space!


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  • 10/31/17--17:00: Responsive Telescope
  • © Jasper Annyas & Auke Klazema

    Today we invite you to share in the latest success of the Radio Observatory with us, and a piece of cake. A long-standing wish of our LOFAR users has been fulfilled with the delivery of the Responsive Telescope functionality in the October software roll-out.

    Our versatile telescope now reacts to external triggers, without the need of personnel in the control room and can do this faster than the manual procedure. Some checks are done (f.i. comparing the priority of the trigger to that of the current observation) and if they all comply, the current observation is aborted and the one specified in the trigger is loaded in the scheduler. There you go: LOFAR hunts for another unique event in the sky!

    Apart from this important step in the LOFAR development, the RO got valuable experience delivering new software, while at the same time doing general support. This will be used in our future projects, as we want to improve and expand on our software deliveries, while at the same time keeping up our support.


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    © @Astron

    BALTICS is an educational program funded by the European Union. It is meant to share our expertise with the staff of Ventspils International Radio Astronomy Center (VIRAC) in Latvia, so that they will be able to carry out internationally-competing scientific research.

    ASTRON is one of the two partners involved in this project challenging project, together with University of Manchester (UMAN).

    From 25th to the 29th of September the RF course was given in Ventpils to a group of students and staff of the Augstkola in Ventspils. The participants have been educated in all the technical aspects of RF front-ends to be able to receive the radio signals from space.

    The course was divided in four separate parts: RF-basics, RF-systems, Antennas and Hands-on experience. After the basic theory was lectured the students had to do exercises to experience radio frequencies in the real world. State of the art measurement equipment was organized by ASTRON to make sure the students will be in tune of the time and well prepared for next generation radio telescope techniques.

    The photo's give an impression of the week.


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    © Photos: Henri Meulman, Nico Ebbendorf

    During the ILT Board meeting of 26th September 2017, the official signing of full membership of the Irish LOFAR consortium (I-LOFAR) in the International LOFAR Telescope(ILT) foundation took place.

    Witnessed by ILT director Dr. René Vermeulen and the ILT-board members, Professor Peter Gallagher on behalf of the I-LOFAR consortium, together with ILT Board Chair Prof. Philip Best, signed the membership certificate (see picture), confirming that Ireland is the lucky 7th European country to have membership in the International LOFAR telescope!

    LOFAR is a multi-national facility, with ASTRON as the coordinating operational entity for the International LOFAR Telescope. It is a Foundation under Dutch law, and has board members from LOFAR consortia in each of the countries where LOFAR stations are located. The telescope consists of 38 stations in the Netherlands, six in Germany, three in Poland, and one in France, Sweden and the UK. In July 2017, IE613, the thirteenth International LOFAR station, was completed on the grounds of Birr Castle in Ireland (see picture below) The data taken by individual LOFAR stations can be locally processed for scientific programmes, and are also transported by fiber links for combined processing in a central super computer hosted at the University of Groningen in the Netherlands: the ILT is now an aperture synthesis telescope network which spans over 2000 km; it is the largest and most powerful low frequency radio telescope in existence.

    The I-LOFAR consortium is consisting of following universities and institutes:

    Trinity College Dublin, Armagh Observatory, University College Dublin, National University of Ireland - Galway, Dublin Institute for Advanced Studies, Dublin City Univerisity, Athlone Institute of Technology and University College Cork.

    The Irish membership of the ILT not only has significantly enlarged the long-baseline capabilities of LOFAR, but also will contribute to new exiting science with this radio telescope!

    Pictured here are:

    Left picture: Dr René Vermeulen (Director of ILT), Prof. Peter Gallagher (Head of the I-LOFAR Consortium) and Prof. Philip Best (Chair of the ILT Board).
    Right picture:

    Prof. Dominik Schwarz (DE), Prof. Andrzej Krankowski (PL), Prof. Carole Jackson (ASTRON), Prof. Peter Gallagher (IE), Dr. René Vermeulen (ILT/ASTRON), Prof. Philip Best (UK), Prof. Huub Rottgering (NL), Dr. Marijke Haverkorn (NL).
    Picture below, right:

    The I-LOFAR station was officially opened on 27th of July by the Irish Minister of State for Training, Skills, Innovation, Research and Development, John Halligan T.D., in the presence of Lord Rosse (who generously made available the land at Birr Castle), I-LOFAR Chair Prof. Peter Gallagher and other representatives of the I-LOFAR consortium, ILT Director René Vermeulen and ASTRON Roll-out manager Nico Ebbendorf, many other well-wishers, and members of the press.
    Picture below left: LOFAR station at Birr, Co. Offaly Ireland.


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    © Photo: Thomas Jurges

    Only on my second day working for ASTRON (2017-07-04) I took this photo of the Dwingeloo telescope on my morning bicycle ride to work.

    I guess one could call this a lucky shot but sometimes nature has other plans. Not only did I get the telescope nicely centred against the Drenthe's summer sky, a swallow decided to have the leading part in the photo. It managed to be right in the middle above the dish in full flight. Nature never stops to surprise me.


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    © Photos: Henri Meulman, Nico Ebbendorf

    During the ILT Board meeting of 26th September 2017, the official signing of full membership of the Irish LOFAR consortium (I-LOFAR) in the International LOFAR Telescope(ILT) foundation took place.

    Witnessed by ILT director Dr. René Vermeulen and the ILT-board members, Professor Peter Gallagher on behalf of the I-LOFAR consortium, together with ILT Board Chair Prof. Philip Best, signed the membership certificate (see picture), confirming that Ireland is the lucky 7th European country to have membership in the International LOFAR telescope!

    LOFAR is a multi-national facility, with ASTRON as the coordinating operational entity for the International LOFAR Telescope. It is a Foundation under Dutch law, and has board members from LOFAR consortia in each of the countries where LOFAR stations are located. The telescope consists of 38 stations in the Netherlands, six in Germany, three in Poland, and one in France, Sweden and the UK. In July 2017, IE613, the thirteenth International LOFAR station, was completed on the grounds of Birr Castle in Ireland (see picture below) The data taken by individual LOFAR stations can be locally processed for scientific programmes, and are also transported by fiber links for combined processing in a central super computer hosted at the University of Groningen in the Netherlands: the ILT is now an aperture synthesis telescope network which spans over 2000 km; it is the largest and most powerful low frequency radio telescope in existence.

    The I-LOFAR consortium is consisting of following universities and institutes:

    Trinity College Dublin, Armagh Observatory, University College Dublin, National University of Ireland - Galway, Dublin Institute for Advanced Studies, Dublin City Univerisity, Athlone Institute of Technology and University College Cork.

    The Irish membership of the ILT not only has significantly enlarged the long-baseline capabilities of LOFAR, but also will contribute to new exiting science with this radio telescope!

    Pictured here are:

    Left picture: Dr René Vermeulen (Director of ILT), Prof. Peter Gallagher (Head of the I-LOFAR Consortium) and Prof. Philip Best (Chair of the ILT Board).
    Right picture:

    Prof. Dominik Schwarz (DE), Prof. Andrzej Krankowski (PL), Prof. Carole Jackson (ASTRON), Prof. Peter Gallagher (IE), Dr. René Vermeulen (ILT/ASTRON), Prof. Philip Best (UK), Prof. Huub Rottgering (NL), Dr. Marijke Haverkorn (NL).
    Picture below, right:

    The I-LOFAR station was officially opened on 27th of July by the Irish Minister of State for Training, Skills, Innovation, Research and Development, John Halligan T.D., in the presence of Lord Rosse (who generously made available the land at Birr Castle), I-LOFAR Chair Prof. Peter Gallagher and other representatives of the I-LOFAR consortium, ILT Director René Vermeulen and ASTRON Roll-out manager Nico Ebbendorf, many other well-wishers, and members of the press.
    Picture below left: LOFAR station at Birr, Co. Offaly Ireland.


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    © Photo: Thomas Jurges

    Only on my second day working for ASTRON (2017-07-04) I took this photo of the Dwingeloo telescope on my morning bicycle ride to work.

    I guess one could call this a lucky shot but sometimes nature has other plans. Not only did I get the telescope nicely centred against the Drenthe's summer sky, a swallow decided to have the leading part in the photo. It managed to be right in the middle above the dish in full flight. Nature never stops to surprise me.


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    © @Astron

    BALTICS is an educational program funded by the European Union. It is meant to share our expertise with the staff of Ventspils International Radio Astronomy Center (VIRAC) in Latvia, so that they will be able to carry out internationally-competing scientific research.

    ASTRON is one of the two partners involved in this project challenging project, together with University of Manchester (UMAN).

    From 25th to the 29th of September the RF course was given in Ventpils to a group of students and staff of the Augstkola in Ventspils. The participants have been educated in all the technical aspects of RF front-ends to be able to receive the radio signals from space.

    The course was divided in four separate parts: RF-basics, RF-systems, Antennas and Hands-on experience. After the basic theory was lectured the students had to do exercises to experience radio frequencies in the real world. State of the art measurement equipment was organized by ASTRON to make sure the students will be in tune of the time and well prepared for next generation radio telescope techniques.

    The photo's give an impression of the week.


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  • 11/07/17--16:00: MATISSE ships to Chile
  • © NOVA Optical Infrared instrumentation group

    MATISSE, the mid-infrared interferometric spectrograph and imager for ESO's VLTI at Paranal, Chile, reached recently two important milestones. First, the MATISSE consortium -in which also NOVA participates- passed in September its Preliminary Acceptance Europe review (PAE) at the Observatoire de Cote d'Azur in Nice, the major review which proves the readiness of the instrument. Thereafter the 10-ton instrument was carefully disassembled, packed and shipped to Paranal, Chile, the location of ESO's Very Large Telescope VLT, where it arrived last week.

    Being an instrument that is designed to combine coherently the light of the four telescopes of ESO's Very Large Telescope Interferometer (VLTI), MATISSE is able of emulating the aperture of a 200-m telescope, resulting in spatial resolutions up to 5 milliarcsec in the 2.8-5 and 8-13 micrometer wavelength bands. MATISSE is an imager and also a spectrograph with resolutions between 30 and 5000. With these characteristics MATISSE is extremely well suited for the study of Young Stellar Objects (YSOs), Active galactic nuclei (AGNs), asymptotic giant branch stars (AGBs) and planetary nebulae and extra-solar planets.

    In MATISSE the light of the 4 telescopes is imaged on a detector where interference patterns are observed, from which the original image can be reconstructed. Interferometry at optical and near-infrared wavelength is extremely difficult but the verifications showed that the instrument in the lab works as expected. The NOVA Optical and Infrared Instrumentation group at ASTRON designed and built the two Cold Optical Benches, which combine at cryogenic temperatures the beams of the telescopes onto the detectors.

    With the arrival of the instrument on the observing grounds, the next activity is assembly of the instrument at the interferometric laboratory of the observatory. First light is expected early 2018.


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    © Colloquium / public use

    There is a universal connection between the accretion and ejection phenomena that are observed in black holes across the mass scale, from stellar-mass black holes in X-ray binaries to supermassive black holes in AGN. Quantifying this relationship is the first step in understanding the key astrophysical problem of how jets are launched, accelerated and collimated.

    X-ray binaries are ideal systems to study this relationship, as they evolve through outburst on humanly observable timescales. During such outburst, their luminosities increase by several orders of magnitude, with the thermal X-ray emission from the accretion disk and the radio emission from the relativistic jets undergoing dramatic, coupled changes.

    I will present the results of a multiwavelength radio through to X-ray observing campaign of a Galactic black hole X-ray binary and discuss why these campaigns are critical to understand the processes that are occurring around a black hole X-ray binary.

    In the image we see the contemporaneous evolution of the accretion inflow and the jet outflow, highlighting that time-resolved, multiwavelength observation are critical to the understanding these objects.


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  • 11/09/17--16:00: Blind self-calibration
  • © Stefan Wijnholds

    Blind calibration techniques can be used to calibrate arrays when no (accurate) source model is available, for example due to observing in a new frequency window or due to unexpected sources like transients and RFI. A well-known example of a blind calibration technique is redundancy calibration, which was originally proposed for the WSRT. Unfortunately, this only works for regular arrays. Inspired by one of the key premises of self-calibration, namely that the sky can be modeled by a limited number of source components, a few DOME researchers started looking into blind calibration using a sparsity constraint on the source model.

    This plot shows a comparison between the gain phase solutions obtained for a few antennas of the LOFAR CS002 LBA outer station by standard calibration procedures using a source model (solid curves) and by blind calibration using a sparsity constraint (dots). The results agree very well! The slightly larger spread in the blind calibration solutions can be explained by rounding the actual source positions of Cas A and Cyg A to image grid points in the alignment step needed to resolve the phase / source position ambiguity in blind calibration.

    An interesting result from the literature on sparse reconstruction is that, if the source model is identifiable, the estimation accuracy for image reconstruction is identical to that of the socalled oracle estimator. This non-existing estimator knows, a priori, where the sources are. This implies that, if the apparent calibration source fluxes need to be estimated, for example due to unknown direction dependent effects common to all receivers, the calibration accuracy of blind calibration is identical to that of regular self-calibration! This is one of the key insights gained from this blind calibration study, whose details are discussed in a recent MNRAS paper by Simone Chiarucci and Stefan Wijnholds.


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    © Astron

    Every weekend now, test observations are being performed with Apertif. Although the full system is not available yet (in terms of number of dishes, bandwidth, etc.), meaningful tests of the performance of the instrument and of the software can be done.

    One of the principal aims of Apertif is to survey very large regions of the sky to detect the atomic hydrogen in galaxies in order to find many many galaxies of all types and sizes, and to use this information to learn more about galaxy structure and evolution. In order to test the readiness of Apertif for such wide-field hydrogen observations, an observation was done pointing at a nearby group of galaxies, the group around the galaxy NGC 5033. This group has been studied with the old WSRT several times before, so a direct comparison between Apertif and the WSRT can be made.

    The movie loops through a small selection of frequency channels of the observing band, and shows the central 2 x 1.5 degree region of the full 3 x 3 degree field of view of the observation. Many images are empty (i.e. the wavy ocean blue), but in several channels, at several locations, hydrogen from a number of galaxies is detected (the red-white spots). The movie is the result of a single night of Apertif observing. With the old WSRT it would take about two weeks to cover the same field. All data were automatically calibrated and reduced with the Apertif pipelines.

    There are two reasons why the signal from the hydrogen from different galaxies is detected at different frequencies; and that also within a galaxy, the emission is spread over many frequency channels. One reason is the fact that the Universe is expanding. This means that while radiation is travelling from a galaxy to the telescope, the waves are stretched along the way, increasing the wavelength and thus lowering the frequency of the wave. The more distant a galaxy, the more the frequency changes.

    The second reason is that within a galaxy, gas from one part of a galaxy moves with respect to gas from other parts, for example because the gas reservoir in the galaxy rotates around its centre. Because of the Doppler effect, the radio waves from these different regions are detected at slightly different frequencies. These shifts are on top of those due to the Universal expansion. From these 'internal' shifts, one can derive how the gas moves in a galaxy, which tells a lot about the galaxy's internal structure.

    The movie covers only about 1/3 of the full field of view and only a small fraction of the final Apertif frequency band (4 MHz out of 300 MHz). Nevertheless, already 9 objects are detected (one of which is a cloud floating in between galaxies). So this observation demonstrates that each single, full Apertif observation will uncover the hydrogen in a few hundred galaxies. We plan to do more than a thousand of such observations, so we can be looking forward to detect about half a million galaxies...


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    © ASTRON

    Two months ago, on Wednesday 13 September, ASTRON had a serious main electrical power interface failure. Since then the ASTRON site received all its electrical power from an Atlas Copco QAS 500 generator that is shown on the photo.

    The yellow box is the generator and it contains a Volvo engine that drives an alternator to generate up to 500 kVA or 400 kW. The QAS 500 is the second largest generator in that range and it weighs about 5500 kg, so it is quite a device. The grey box next to it contains the diesel fuel. At maximum load the generator takes about 100 litres/hour. For comparison, that is about as much as 10 cars. The generator powered our building and remarkably also an electrical car that was charging during the day. On average the generator used 1200 litres of diesel per day, so about 50 litres per hour.

    Last weekend, the ASTRON site was successfully reconnected to the power grid. In the meantime, this generator has provided an appropriate and technically interesting solution. Many thanks to the BHV, and the general affairs and ICT departments for handling this entire incident so well.


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  • 11/14/17--16:00: Jubilee day
  • © ASTRON

    Today at 15.00 hours we will hold our first jubilee day celebrating the working anniversaries of 2017. Some colleagues celebrate their 12,5 years and others 25 years employment at ASTRON, NOVA or JIVE. With drinks, cake and speeches we will raise our glass to toast our colleagues on these milestones.

    Unfortunately, not all jubilees will be able to attend but we wish everyone having a work anniversary in 2017 a happy jubilee day with many more years to come.


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    © LOFAR Surveys Key Science Project

    The LOFAR Two-metre Sky Survey (LoTSS) is a deep 120-168 MHz imaging survey that will eventually cover the entire Northern sky. Each of the 3170 pointings will be observed for 8 hrs, which, at most declinations, is sufficient to produce ~6" resolution images with a sensitivity of ~100 micro-Jy/beam and accomplish the main scientific aims of the survey which includes studying magnetic fields and particle acceleration mechanisms in clusters of galaxies. In this talk I will overview the present status of the survey with a specific focus on galaxy cluster science.

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