Are you the publisher? Claim or contact us about this channel


Embed this content in your HTML

Search

Report adult content:

click to rate:

Account: (login)

More Channels


Channel Catalog


Channel Description:

A daily view of all the goings-on at ASTRON and JIVE.

older | 1 | .... | 51 | 52 | (Page 53) | 54 | 55 | .... | 71 | newer

    0 0

    © Bassa, Adams, Maddox, Hessels

    At the beginning of this year we presented the localization of the repeating fast radio burst FRB121102. Ground based observations with the 8-m Gemini telescope on Mauna Kea revealed the z=0.193 host galaxy, which displayed strong emission lines of Hydrogen and Oxygen, indicating it is a dwarf galaxy with low-metallicity star formation.

    Follow-up observations with the Gemini telescope, the Hubble Space Telescope and the Spitzer telescope, reveal that the host galaxy consists of a bright star forming region in the outskirts of the irregular dwarf galaxy. The panels on the left show the infrared (J and H-band) images from the Hubble Space Telescope, where the red circle indicates the star forming region, while the purple ellipse

    denotes the extent of the host galaxy. The white cross denotes the location of the FRB as measured with the EVN. We find that the FRB is coincident with the star formation region. The multi-band images allow us to constrain the spectral energy distribution, shown in the right hand plot, which constrains the host galaxy mass to 10E8 solar masses, confirming the dwarf nature of the host.

    The similarity of the FRB121102 host galaxy with host galaxies of hydrogen-poor superluminous supernovae and long-duration gamma-ray bursts suggests that fast radio bursts may be linked to newly born neutron stars or magnetars, as these sources are believed to be born in low-metallicity environments.

    Our findings have been published in Bassa, Tendulkar, Adams, Maddox et al. (2017, ApJ 843, 8).


    0 0

    © NOVA

    The past six months Luuk Tigelaar worked as an intern on the development of a fixture for retaining an optical filter in a filter exchange mechanism. This mechanism is developed and build by the NOVA Optical InfraRed Instrumentation group and will be part of the MICADO instrument developed by MPE in Germany. MICADO is selected as a first light instrument on the E-ELT in Chili.

    Part of the challenge was to engineer a mechanical mount which would hold the glass element with minimum force (i.e. minimum deformation) while at the same time maximizing thermal contact for rapid cooling from room temperature to below -200degC. A key parameter is the thermal resistance of the glass-aluminium interface. These values are hard to find in literature and highly depend on a range of different characteristics like temperature, clamping force, surface roughness, filler material etc.

    Pictured is Luuk during his final presentation at NOVA-ASTRON with on the table, covered in insulating foil, his cryogenic test setup of the glass-aluminium interface.

    The second image shows its internals in detail. The test setup is optimized to accurately measure the actual thermal contact resistance between glass and aluminium in a cryogenic environment (i.e. vacuum & at low temperature) while maintaining a constant clamping force. The latter is not trivial as the used materials behave differently in the cold (shrinkage, stiffness).

    Thanks to Luuk his eagerness to learn, his creativity and determination, we now have a viable cooling concept and an accurate thermal simulation model based on the obtained parameter values. This allows us to optimize the mechanical design and thermal performance of the filter mount and exchange mechanism for MICADO.


    0 0

    © ASTRON

    Also radio galaxies have a cycle of life. They can get old and die, but in some cases they can also be reborn.

    Why is this interesting? First of all, we still don't know exactly what determines this cycle. Furthermore, the way the source evolves determines their impact on the surrounding medium, influencing also the life of the host galaxy. The phase in which a radio source is dying can be best explored at low radio frequencies, where low-energy electrons can radiate for longer times. This is, therefore, an ideal task for LOFAR.

    As part of the ERC project RadioLife, we are exploring this and a milestone has been obtained with the publication of the paper presenting simulations for building “mock” samples of radio sources for which different evolutionary scenarios can be explored. These simulations are essential for comparing with, and interpreting, the observations.

    These results are presented in the paper "On the population of remnant FRII radio galaxies and implications for radio source dynamics" by Leith Godfrey, Raffaella Morganti and Marisa Brienza accepted for publication on the Monthly Notices of Royal Astronomical Society (see also https://arxiv.org/abs/1706.05909 ).

    The figure shows two histograms from the paper, illustrating the distribution of the spectral indices and ages of the sources in one of our mock catalogues obtained under the assumption of expansion of the source in the remnant phase. Green bars represent active sources, red bars represent remnant sources. The important new findings is that not all remnant sources are ultra-steep spectrum, unlike what always assumed in the past.

    Thanks to this new tool, we are now exploring the LOFAR data: watch this space for more results!


    0 0

    © Tom Oosterloo

    The Apertif Imaging team met the 6th and 7th of June to start planning for Apertif Imaging Early Science. We spent the first day discussing science interests and ideas, an especially great introduction for new Ph.D. students who have recently joined the Apertif team. The second day we had a focused discussion on the nitty-gritty of what we will do for Early Science and, just as importantly, what we have to first do to be ready for it. While we still have a while until we can start Early Science, we left with a renewed vigor to tackle science verification in preparation!

    In the photo above, you can see the Apertif Imaging Team gathered for the first day of science discussions. It was great to see the breadth of science interests in the team!


    0 0

    © ASTRON

    Ger struggled mightily to hold on until after WimSym77, of which he was the chief organiser. He succeeded, but on Sunday July 9th 2017 he had to give up the unequal battle with an aggressive illness.

    A very promising student in Oort's Leiden, he was the only astronomer interviewed in the Teleac TV series who was not (yet) a doctor. After a period at CalTech, he was lured back to SRZM/ASTRON in 1976, and quickly became "Mr WSRT", one of the most productive and respected users of this wonderful radio telescope. He was a highly motivating force behind the continuous development of cutting-edge software and hardware for it, and devised and executed penetrating observing programs like the WENSS survey.

    He was part of the group in Dwingeloo that first discussed the design of a Square Km Array. Of course he played a major role in the design and commissioning of the LOFAR telescope, and could be regarded as "Mr LOFAR" also. He was joint leader of its EoR Key Science Programme.

    As a half-time professor in Groningen, he supervised a long line of brilliant PhD students, of whom he was very proud. Besides, he was a keen and talented sportsman (skating, tennis, running, billiards) and simply excellent company. His simplicity was as profound as his intellect and wit. We commiserate with Aline, Maya and Vikram.

    A few years ago, a 4-year-old poetess coined the line "More than Tall" for Ger, who was very taken by it. And indeed it is apt because, thanks to the lovely ambiguity of the English language, it can have multiple meanings, all of them good. So many people can assign their own story with Ger to these three well-chosen words.

    De uitvaart plechtigheid is op vrijdag 14 juli 15:00 in het Afscheidshuis Reestborgh, Edison 1, 7942 Meppel. Na afloop is er gelegenheid tot condoleeren. Een kaart voor de familie ligt ter ondertekening op de gebruikelijke plaats.


    0 0

    © ASTRON

    Ger struggled mightily to hold on until after WimSym77, of which he was the chief organiser. He succeeded, but on Sunday July 9th 2017 he had to give up the unequal battle with an aggressive illness.

    A very promising student in Oort's Leiden, he was the only astronomer interviewed in the Teleac TV series who was not (yet) a doctor. After a period at CalTech, he was lured back to SRZM/ASTRON in 1976, and quickly became "Mr WSRT", one of the most productive and respected users of this wonderful radio telescope. He was a highly motivating force behind the continuous development of cutting-edge software and hardware for it, and devised and executed penetrating observing programs like the WENSS survey.

    He was part of the group in Dwingeloo that first discussed the design of a Square Km Array. Of course he played a major role in the design and commissioning of the LOFAR telescope, and could be regarded as "Mr LOFAR" also. He was joint leader of its EoR Key Science Programme.

    As a half-time professor in Groningen, he supervised a long line of brilliant PhD students, of whom he was very proud. Besides, he was a keen and talented sportsman (skating, tennis, running, billiards) and simply excellent company. His simplicity was as profound as his intellect and wit. We commiserate with Aline, Maya and Vikram.

    A few years ago, a 4-year-old poetess coined the line "More than Tall" for Ger, who was very taken by it. And indeed it is apt because, thanks to the lovely ambiguity of the English language, it can have multiple meanings, all of them good. So many people can assign their own story with Ger to these three well-chosen words.

    De uitvaart plechtigheid is op vrijdag 14 juli 15:00 in het Afscheidshuis Reestborgh, Edison 1, 7942 Meppel. Na afloop is er gelegenheid tot condoleeren. Een kaart voor de familie ligt ter ondertekening op de gebruikelijke plaats.


    0 0

    © Madroon Community Consultants (MCC)

    The editors of the ASTRON/JIVE Daily Image are delighted that the new ASTRON Director is as great a fan of the AJDI as her reveredpredecessor. Virtually her first act was to select the best AJDI of 2016. The image shows her bestowing the prize on Paula Fusiara of the mechanical engineering department.

    Paula is a fairly recent ASTRON employee, but she has "hit the ground running" by submitting lots of AJDIs, which are clearly recognizable by their exuberantstyle.

    We are looking forward to many more.


    0 0
  • 07/17/17--17:00: RO Uitje 2017
  • © Images: R. Pizzo, M. van der Wiel, V. Moss

    The annual RO Uitje took place on Wednesday 5th July 2017. The day began very early in the carpark of Van der Valk, with the bus heading (mostly) directly towards the Meyer Werft ship-building factory in Papenburg, Germany. Along the way we ate a range of pastries and coffee. Once there, we were given a tour of their visitor centre and two of the factories, one of which contained a gigantic cruise ship under construction worth ~850 million Euros!

    After the tour, we boarded the bus and ate a tasty lunch in Papenburg, at a restaurant called Gasthof Tepe: a mix of hot food, featuring meat, potatoes, fish, vegetables alongside a variety of beers and drinks. Also tasty dessert of mousse and cheese! Next stop after that was the historic and picturesque village of Bourtange, designed to emulate what life in the fortress was like in the past. There were several shops and museums to visit, including an exhibit on Aletta Jacobs, the first female Dutch doctor and a pioneer in many ways. Candle-making was also possible!

    Before leaving Bourtange, we had borrel of snacks and drinks. We took a nice group photo of everyone, which you see featured in this post. Tiny little flying monsters (known as onweersbeestjes) joined the party and tried to smuggle themselves back to ASTRON.

    Then we drove back to Dwingeloo, with some attendees staying on for what was reported to be a very tasty dinner at Il Rustico. All in all, an excellent and fun day exploring the nearby surroundings and getting to know people across the RO better. Thanks to the organisers of this year's utije for a great time!

    To see photos taken (by Roberto, Matthijs and Vanessa), visit the interactive mosaic here: http://mosaically.com/photomosaic/f6a48db8-c7d8-4680-906a-ea5feb22c237


    0 0

    © ASTRON, photo by Cees Bassa

    With the technical hurdles of DRAGNET in LOFAR operations behind us, we focused for a moment on softer matters before developing the next instrumental extension.

    DRAGNET is a user managed cluster that can directly take data from the COBALT correlator/beamformer. It communicates with Observatory support systems for monitoring & control and for maintenance & testing. This introduces a shared operational responsibility between the Observatory and the DRAGNET team.

    To ensure everyone is on the same page with the roles, interactions and tooling, we organized a session for telescope scientists, observers, observatory software developers, and DRAGNET science users to inform them and to hear from them. About 25 people attended, some having to sit on the side stand in the Oort meeting room.

    The image on the left shows Jason Hessels presenting a short introduction. After that, Alexander explained how to operate DRAGNET (a slide is shown on the right) and how to ensure it remains operational in a changing environment.

    An open discussion followed the presentations. Some of the discussion topics were: 1) The need to resolve the lack of DRAGNET observation inspection plots to quickly assess the result of an observation. 2) How DRAGNET can participate in Observatory tests after software roll-outs and other system changes. (Collaboration on this already ramped up a few days later.) 3) To revisit pipeline processing to be automatically suspended & restarted at the start & end of observations. We have annotated the discussion outcomes in the slides for future reference, perhaps in a more formal, written agreement after several months of operational experience.

    The DRAGNET team would like to thank all participants for their interest and input! The 6 science observations so far were successful.

    This project has received funding from the European Research Council under the European Union's Seventh Framework Programme (FP7/2007-2013) / ERC grant agreement nr. 337062 (PI Hessels). J.W.T.H. acknowledges funding from an NWO Vidi fellowship.


    0 0
  • 07/19/17--17:00: PhD defence Erik Vermij
  • © DOME

    The fourth of July, Erik Vermij successfully defended his phd research at the Delft University of Technology. He worked in the DOME project, focusing on novel hardware architectures supporting the needs of the SKA as well as many other types of data-intensive applications.

    The thesis and propositions can be found here: http://doi.org/10.4233/uuid:9976d272-a596-4ad0-ab9e-de230cd0aba3


    0 0

    © Fotos: Menno Norden, Henri Meulman

    On July 14th, 2017 the newly built International LOFAR station IE613 in Birr, Ireland had first light!

    The Low Band Antenna (LBA) system of this station showed for the first time a spectrum from the entire band as received by the 96 antenae. It was an impressive clean spectrum too.

    On the picture left, an LBA all-sky image at 40 MHz is shown in which the Milky Way and CasA can be seen. This image by Menno Norden, was created a few days after 1st light during the Site Acceptance Test (SAT) of the station.

    On the picture right, the roll-out team from I-LOFAR is showing the plot as received for the first time. This team for more than six weeks has built-up the Irish LOFAR Telescope literally from the bottom starting to fill the trenches with many kilometers of coaxial cables, assembling over 32 thousand pieces of EPS parts forming the High Band antennae and finally placing all the LBA antennae including heavy weight groundplanes on their final destinations. Picture on the right, below is showing the newly built station under a perfect blue sky and located at the premises of Birr Castle, Co. Offaly. Respect to this I-LOFAR team for building up this station!

    Our commission team Menno Norden, Henri Meulman en Klaas Stuurwold now are continuing to bring-up the high-speed data connection and the High Band antenna system.

    Station IE613 is from the I-LOFAR consortium (consisting of following universities and institutes: TCD, Armagh, UCD, DCU, UCC, NUIG, DIAS and AIT).

    Congratulations to the entire I-LOFAR crew for achieving this great result!


    0 0

    © Madroon Community Consultants (MCC)

    WimSym77 has come and gone, and it was all we could have hoped for. The Van der Hulst auditorium at ASTRON was packed with admirers from all over the world, young and old(er), already famous and up-and-coming. The remote contributions from far-flung continents went well, at least on the ASTRON side(*).

    The various talks on Science, Software, Leadership and Politics tended to be rather heavy on substance, which was much appreciated by Mr Substance himself. Fortunately, a few speakers took it upon themselves to offer a little balance to the cartloads of outrageous (but well-deserved) praise(**) that was heaped upon our smiling Wizard. Many also paid tribute to Joan, the Wizard's Wife (see image). She has been an important stabilizing force in his dizzy orbit, as he graciously acknowledged in his closing remarks

    The proceedings were followed intently by Ger de Bruyn, the chairman of the organizing committee, from his sick-bed. The speakers all managed to fully involve him, as one of Wim's closest collaborators and friend, while not allowing his condition to overshadow Wim's moment.

    The high point was the lovely barbecue underneath the 25m radio telescope, a singular honor that will not be bestowed on anyone else. The gods themselves smiled upon it with beautiful weather, while the sermon was delivered by much-cited Jaap Baars from halfway up the telescope structure.

    (*) Thank you Jan Slagter, Merijn Martens

    (**) For instance, the WSRT is the only known case where the software of a major telescope was delivered on schedule on time. He did it all singlehandedly, and everything worked! Etc, etc...


    0 0
  • 07/24/17--17:00: First HI images with Apertif
  • © astron

    Recent months have seen steady progress with Apertif, and more and more the system can be used to do real astronomical observations. One of the main changes that have been implemented is that fringe stopping can now routinely be used during observations instead of applying it off-line, after the observation. Applying fringe stopping off-line is only an approximation and the images clearly suffered from this.

    With the latest changes, the data are much easier to handle and the calibration and reduction can now be done in exactly the same way as with the 'old' WSRT. As a result, more and more images are being made now with Apertif.

    An example is given below. The left panel gives the distribution of the atomic hydrogen (contours) in the well-known galaxy M51 (grayscale). The right panel gives a movie of the HI distribution in the various channels of the observation, superposed on the continuum image which was also made from these Apertif data.


    0 0

    © Fotos: Menno Norden, Henri Meulman

    On 14 July, 2017, the newly built International LOFAR station IE613 in Birr, Ireland had first light! Congratulations to the entire I-LOFAR crew for achieving this great result!

    The Low Band Antenna (LBA) system of this station showed for the first time a spectrum from the entire band as received by the 96 antennae. It was an impressive clean spectrum too.

    On the picture left, an LBA all-sky image at 40 MHz is shown in which the Milky Way and CasA can be seen. This image by Menno Norden, was created only one day after 1st light while continuing the Site Acceptance Test (SAT) of the station.

    Picture on the upper right is showing the LBA-part of the newly built station under a perfect blue sky and located at the premises of Birr Castle, Co. Offaly. As can be seen, additional tubing is mounted around the antenna wires in order to protect these from animals having appetite to the wires and rubbers.

    Our commission team Menno Norden, Henri Meulman en Klaas Stuurwold now are continuing to bring-up the high-speed data connection and the High Band Antenna system.

    Station IE613 is from the I-LOFAR consortium (consisting of following universities and institutes: TCD, Armagh, UCD, DCU, UCC, NUIG, DIAS and AIT).


    0 0

    © Fotos: Menno Norden, Henri Meulman

    After nearly seven weeks of hard work, the truly dedicated I-LOFAR crew have now finished building their own LOFAR station. They filled trenches with many kilometres of coaxial cables and assembled over 35.000 individual parts that form the High Band antennas. After placing all the Low Band antennas, including heavy weight ground planes, a decisive moment took place: executing the Site Acceptance Test (SAT).

    The Site Acceptance Test is a crucial milestone for two reasons:

    1: It gives proof of the electrical performance of the station;

    2: It is an agreed (final) milestone in the contract between Trinity College Dublin, acting as the formal contracting party on behalf of the I-LOFAR consortium, and to AstroTec Holding BV, a fully owned subsidiary of ASTRON.

    AstroTec is responsible for the delivery of all required hardware components, sub-assemblies and roll-out support needed to build an International LOFAR station.

    The Site Acceptance Test, also known as the electrical commissioning, was executed by our commissioning team: Menno Norden, Henri Meulman and Klaas Stuurwold. During the SAT, the performance is tested of all Low Band Antennas, all High Band Antennas, the station processing hardware tree starting from the RCUs, RSPs, TBBs and the LCU. Finally, all network equipment as mounted in the RFI-container was connected by an optical fibre link to the high-speed network concluding the connection with the supercomputer of LOFAR. Special attention was taken to assure no phase-errors are in the system caused by mixing up the X and the Y coaxial connection joints (7296 in total!) somewhere in the station.

    Station IE613 successfully passed its SAT!

    Witnessed by representatives from the I-LOFAR consortium (picture left: Joe McCauley and Aoife Maria Ryan from TCD) it was concluded that all electrical systems are operational. Only some small issues where detected but all could be resolved during the commissioning phase (on the picture below, right: Henri Meulman troubleshooting a malfunctioning HBA tile).

    Picture on the upper-right is showing the signing of the SAT document by Dr. Joe McCauley on behalf of the I-LOFAR consortium. On behalf of AstroTec Holding, Menno Norden signed the formal SAT document.

    Special thanks to Joe McCauley from Trinity College Dublin for his flawless execution of his task as project manager on behalf of the I-LOFAR consortium. One has to check out all the tweets (#I_LOFAR) to understand a little about the many tasks that have been executed for realising this beautiful Irish LOFAR station. It seems to be that he even was able to control the weather as during the roll-out the conditions were near perfect. Of course, the achievement of realising this beautiful LOFAR station has to be shared with all dedicated members of the I-LOFAR crew working so hard to build their telescope.

    Concluding the Site Acceptance Test makes the station qualified to serve as an International LOFAR station. Congratulations for achieving this great result!


    0 0

    © PIC-net team

    A team of experienced amateur astro-imagers recently spent a week on the observatory Pic du Midi (French Pyrenees) to work with the observatory's 1 meter telescope. It was built in the 60's of last century. Equipped with modern camera's they've made hundreds of images of Venus, Jupiter and Saturn using lucky imaging techniques and post processing.

    The animation shows the best results, which are now considered the best ground-based images ever made.

    The PIC-net team is: Constantin Sprianu, Damian Peach, Marc Delcroix, Emil Kraaikamp(*), Gerard Thorin, Francois Colas and Ricardo Hueso

    Apart from the incredible skills of the team and the good conditions during imaging, this work is a great tribute to the creator of this 1 meter telescope, Jean Texereau who was one of the greatest telescope makers in the 20th century. Too bad he did not live long enough to be able to see these images himself, he died in 2014, at age 95.

    More information about this campaign to Pic du Midi can be found here: http://pic-net.org/

    (*) Emil is a gifted Dutch amateur astro-imager who develops his own software. A few years ago he gave a colloquium at ASTRON, and the subsequent AJDI scored the largest number of worldwide hits ever. There are more like him, working away in attic rooms within a 50 km radius around ASTRON.


    0 0
  • 07/30/17--17:00: Liquid Cooling Distribution
  • © ASTRON

    CSIRO and ASTRON have developed the Gemini board for the SKA-Low correlator and beamformer. The heart of the board is a Xilinx FPGA (Field Programmable Gate Array) which will burn over 100 Watts of power. Liquid cooling will be used to cool down the board and its components. Twelve Gemini boards will be integrated in a subrack (mechanical housing). At the backside of the subrack a backplane will be installed to connect the Gemini boards.

    One of the challenges to overcome was the distribution of coolant to the twelve boards. For that the mechanical group has designed a manifold which is placed at the backside and takes care of the liquid distribution to all of the boards. The boards can be ejected and plugged in, while the liquid remains flowing. The successful test of this action without any liquid spill was a good reason to eat cake and celebrate the completion of the design.

    On the picture Hiddo is showing proudly the next achievement: distribution of the liquid to the FPGA and other components on the board. As you can see, the design is ready on paper. Next the design will be produced by Sjouke of the mechanical group and tested together with Gijs from the DESP group (Digital and Embedded Signal Processing).


    0 0
  • 07/31/17--17:00: The Group Photo
  • © ASTRON

    After a few years of no group photo, this year we decided to make a new group photo. So, during the annual ASTRON and JIVE mid-summer barbecue on 29 June 2017, we tried to get everybody on one photo. After some shuffling around the photographer was ready to give it a shot.

    Now we have the final result, almost no closed eyes, that is pretty impressive with such a large group, since there are almost 200 people on one photo.


    0 0

    © Vanessa Moss

    Last week, Michiel Brentjens gave Pietro Zucca, Sander ter Veen and myself a crash course in writing our own LOFAR imagers from scratch using Python. This meant going back to the very basic steps, starting with a binary file which we recorded ourselves on each of our respective international LBA stations (DE601, SE607 and DE603) and eventually Fourier-transforming the data to reveal the sky above! The goal here was for us to try coding the key steps that are taken to go from dipole data to sky data (image: top left), which are carried out in more complicated ways by much more advanced imagers such as CASA, AIPS and MIRIAD.

    Michiel also showed us how to change the plane of imaging from the sky to the ground. My station (DE603, Tautenburg) conveniently happened to show some neat transient radio frequency interference (RFI) during the observations (image: top right). RFI decorrelates on international baselines, so it is not a problem for regular LOFAR observations, but it does influence calibration solutions and local station use. From the sky image, we could tell the RFI was located north-west of the LBA. By imaging a few 100m to the NW of the phase centre of DE603LBA, we were able to roughly locate the RFI to within a control building associated with the nearby optical telescope Thueringische Landessternwarte Tautenburg (image: bottom left/right). Pretty awesome that you can easily use interferometric visibility data to go RFI-hunting without needing anything other than Fourier transforms!

    While this was a basic exercise in interferometry, it was extremely useful (and cool!!) for us to be able to quickly image the sky/ground nearby any LOFAR LBA station. We look forward to much fun in the future with LOFAR imaging!


    0 0
  • 08/02/17--17:00: NCLE: First Light
  • © ASTRON

    Last week, the first (of three) of The Netherlands China Long-wavelength Explorer (NCLE) boards, for which ASTRON is responsible and that will be shipped to China for testing on the Chang'e 4 satellite, flickered to life. The little green light depicted in the lower left figure gives the A-okay for the power supply to the low-noise amplifier (LNA) that will ultimately guide some of the oldest signals in our universe to digitization.

    Breathing life into this LNA-board has by no means been a trivial task. With Mark Ruiter overseeing the design, Sieds Damstra meticulously placed and traced around 1000 component footprints that make up the layout of this LNA. As shown in the top left figure, Albert van Duin had to make use of most of the resources available within the visible spectrum to keep track of the component positions during assembly. With the steady hand of Margaretha ten Caat from Major Electronics b.v. guided by Albert's preparatory artwork, all surface mount components were fixed in place in a single day's work.

    Finally, moving higher still in frequency, the board assembly was inspected through x-ray images at Neways, shown in the center-left image.

    This LNA-board, along with the remaining two, will soon be shipped to China where they will be put to the test to ensure that their green lights will continue burning at their final destination depicted here on the right: the far-side of the moon.


older | 1 | .... | 51 | 52 | (Page 53) | 54 | 55 | .... | 71 | newer